Jeremy Lin Gets Cheered Up by Friends in Sketch Comedy Bit


Jeremy Lin--genuine, "real" human being

Jeremy Lin–genuine, “real” human being

Jeremy Lin is an amazing guy, who, obviously doesn’t take himself too seriously–though he does so much good work that he refuses to publicize (including providing my Asian American daughter a surprise, unsolicited pep talk via a 30 minute video chat). He is a man who truly lives his faith and does so with great joy.

Jeremy Lin--genuine, "real" human being

Jeremy Lin–genuine, “real” human being

Asian Athletes Blog

Jeremy Lin is now a member of the Los Angeles Lakers, and he is wasting no time in going Hollywood.

via Jeremy Lin Gets Cheered Up by Friends in Sketch Comedy Bit | Bleacher Report.

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Babel Fish? Skype Translator provides instantaneous translations for videoconferences


Story and images by Manish Singh / WinBeta Earlier this year, 

Earlier this year, Microsoft announced “Skype Translator”, a ground breaking feature which would allow two people speaking in different languages to have audio conversations. At the company’s Worldwide Partner Conference event, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced a development to that project — Skype Translator now facilitates video conferencing as well.

Source: www.telepresenceoptions.com

Although universal communication among people speaking different languages is certainly a worthy goal, I am reluctant to embrace the technology that allegedly allows instantaneous translation during audio/video conferences among speakers of different languages–for many reasons.

  • My ethnic Kazakh daughter and I are bilingual (English & Russian), and I have found that the act, itself, of learning a new language necessarily draws one closer to the customs and practices of the people who use the language in their day-to-day lives (requiring an examination of nearly every aspect of the lives of those who speak the “different language”–allowing, at least the feeling of, adoption of a new and different culture).
  • Language (particularly oral as opposed to written) is an imprecise method of communication, and even experienced translators will attest that different languages have idiosyncrasies that do not allow for an accurate or precise communication of a particular idea, description or opinion sought to be сonveyed. Подвиг (Podvig) is a Russian word used to describe a particular idea in Eastern Orthodox Christianity is an example of one such word–though others may disagree
  • Because of the decline of formal language usage in favor of slang and the explosion of the use of acronyms (SMH, YOLO, WTF), and the multitudes of “figures of speech”, I am skeptical that current technology exists that would allow a computer program algorithm to translate accurately and instantaneously the communications between people speaking different languages.
  • Upon reflection, I could not support the widespread use of the technology described in this article. Language, in its many different and beautiful forms, is a reflection of the culture, history and heritage of those who speak it.

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I knew when I was in Almaty, I saw many tall, beautiful, athletic Kazakh ladies, I just didn’t expect my daughter to ever grow up (and become one)


The article in the link below (and the images that follow) speaks for itself. The article appeared in the Huffington Post. Obviously, the picture of the basketball player (in and out of uniform) is my daughter, and the ugly guy in the one picture is her father (me).

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/27/sabina-altynbekova-beautiful-volleyball_n_5625530.html

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I knew when I was in Almaty, I saw many tall, beautiful, athletic Kazakh ladies, I just didn’t expect my daughter to ever grow up (and become one)


The article in the link below (and the images that follow) speaks for itself. The article appeared in the Huffington Post. Obviously, the picture of the basketball player (in and out of uniform) is my daughter, and the ugly guy in the one picture is her father (me).

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/27/sabina-altynbekova-beautiful-volleyball_n_5625530.html

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This Hilarious Ad Perfectly Captures the Awkwardness of Puberty


TIME

If you thought sitcoms were 22 minutes long, think again. This amazing ad for HelloFlo tells a full coming-of-age story (complete with beginning, middle and end) in just over 2 minutes.

It’s so great to see an ad that is both hilarious and insightful, and totally nails the awkwardness surrounding the first period. Extra points for resisting the schmaltzy “love yourself” messaging that seems to have infected most other ads aimed at women. Plus, a period starter-pack actually seems like a really smart product that young women actually need.

Watch it all the way to the end. The ketchup is the best part.

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The Science of Storytelling


Many studies show us that our brains prefer storytelling to facts.When we read facts, only the language parts of our brains work to understand the meaning. When we read a story, the language parts of our brains and any other part of the brain that we would use if we were actually experiencing what we’re reading, light up.This means that it’s easier for us to remember stories than facts. Our brains can’t make major distinctions between a story we’re reading about and something we are actually doing….

Source: writerswrite.co.za

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Bully describes why she “bullied” and her epiphany


Bully describes why she “bullied” and expresses remorse for her middle school actions In the link below from Upworthy–a fantastic collection of interesting videos on YouTube.

http://www.upworthy.com/she-confronted-her-bully-and-asked-one-question-now-the-bully-has-an-awesome-story-to-tell?c=upw1 

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4 Stages Of COPD


Please don’t make the mistake of looking down at people you see in public using portable oxygen devices, and smugly thinking “they got what they deserved” because their poor health is based on their poor lifestyle — choosing to smoke. This judgmental attitude is wrong for many reasons, one of which is that are those us, INCLUDING ME, with Stage 4 (also sometimes called “end stage”) COPD, WHO HAVE NEVER SMOKED AND HAVE LIVED A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE (and I will leave the lack-of-morality-and-compassion reasons out of my post in this instance).

Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’


Vanderbilt University

“Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.


Metacognitive practices increase students’ abilities to transfer or adapt their learning to new contexts and tasks.”

Source: cft.vanderbilt.edu

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