The Racist History of the Charter School Movement–An Interesting Perspective


The article linked below is controversial, yet realistic in its characterization that charter schools are founded on a history of racism. I have had experience with public, parochial and charter schools and found this article to be very interesting. I invite comments, which either support or object to the premise contained in the article.


The Racist History of the Charter School Movement | Alternet.






Native Americans concerned with the effects of fracking on the water table on their sovereign lands

Mountaintop-mining (a form of surface coal mining where the tops of Appalachian mountains are removed to expose valuable coal reserves) and “fracking” (a form of accessing oil and gas reserves that many claim to be destroying water quality and causing subsidence and small earthquakes), are both forms of extracting natural resources for energy production. Both processes involve highly charged support or opposition by the coal/gas & oil industry (and their service industries), on one side, and environmental groups (and their supporters) on the other.

Pro-Mountaintop Mining Coal Miners

Leveling Appalachia


As an environmental attorney working in Appalachia, I have had the misfortune of working on both mountaintop mining issues and oil & gas fracking issues. Unlike other highly charged issues on which I have worked during my career, there is virtually no opportunity for any compromise on either side of these issues, turning political policy decisions on the subjects into metaphorical IEDs, ready to explode and alienate a large segment of voters, regardless of which side benefits from a given policy.

Fracking Policy–Supporters & Opponents are Polar Opposite

Anti-Fracking Process Description


Although I have worked with Native American tribal liaisons regarding ancestral artifacts and human remains, I have never worked with them on issues related to natural resource extraction/exploitation–though I did discuss the issue hypothetically in a graduate level Environmental Ethics course I taught as an adjunct professor. As expected, the students in the course were divided in their strongly held beliefs on both sides of the issue of whether natural resources should be allowed to be removed by private industry from Native American lands, with obvious environmental effects, if the action would result in cheaper electric bills. 

Native American view of land as sacred


The Nation of Change article linked below shows one Native American tribe’s views toward the practice of “fracking” and the effects this process will have on their traditional lands.

 Native Americans Launch ‘Love Water Not Oil’ Ride to Protest Fracking Pipeline

Anishinaabe Native American Activist Poster

Anishinaabe Native American Dance Troupe


I would be interested in receiving feedback on readers’ particular views on these two natural resource extraction methods.