Being Critically Reflective – What does it mean?


The terms ‘critical’ and ‘reflection’ are sorely misunderstood in education. Being critical is often misinterpreted as being negative. Reflection‘ is also frequently distorted to mean “reflect on what you are doing wrong”. Too often the students that we teach give negative feedback when asked to be critical. So to counter act this, educators initiate strategies such as ‘2 stars and a wish’ and SWNI (strengths, weaknesses, new ideas).

These strategies are designed to make reflective practices a more positive experience for students. It teaches them that being critically reflective is not just a negative activity, that it is important to be positive and give feedback to help improve or make something better.

Learn more:




Source: mrkempreflects.blogspot.sg

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Scientists solve 2,000-year-old Terracotta Army mystery


Admittedly, the article cited is a bit for scientifically technical for my tastes, but the authors do a brilliant job of explaining when the army was created (210 BC), how they were formed (too technical of a description to be summarized accurately in this small pace) and how the tens of thousands of perfectly formed soldiers, more importantly, kept their precise forms in such unbelievably great shape over the millennia (Polychrome layers applied to these sculpted imperial guards were composed of natural inorganic pigments and binding media. These pigments have been identified as including cinnabar [HgS], apatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH], azurite [Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2] and malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2], etc., but the precise composition of binding media used in the painting process had long eluded scientists until China scientists discovered a proteinaceous binding media which had been successfully made and applied for the polychrome Terracotta Army.)

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